November 29, 2020

It’s the first week of Advent. Let’s roll.

Our series for Advent is called is Echoes of a Voice. We’ll focus on paying attention to our haunted longings as they point us to Jesus for ultimate fulfillment. In our first week, we’ll discuss our innate longing for justice.

As for non-Sunday-morning participation in the season, we’ve created a weekly guide, some giving initiatives, and a new take on our annual Advent Hymn Sing. Learn much more about all of those things by clicking Resources for Advent below.

Resources for Advent

Now here’s how you can prepare for our first Sunday together in Advent:

1. Read our text, Jeremiah 23:1–8.

See passage

“Woe to the shepherds who destroy and scatter the sheep of my pasture!” declares the Lord. Therefore thus says the Lord, the God of Israel, concerning the shepherds who care for my people: “You have scattered my flock and have driven them away, and you have not attended to them. Behold, I will attend to you for your evil deeds, declares the Lord. Then I will gather the remnant of my flock out of all the countries where I have driven them, and I will bring them back to their fold, and they shall be fruitful and multiply. I will set shepherds over them who will care for them, and they shall fear no more, nor be dismayed, neither shall any be missing, declares the Lord.

“Behold, the days are coming, declares the Lord, when I will raise up for David a righteous Branch, and he shall reign as king and deal wisely, and shall execute justice and righteousness in the land. In his days Judah will be saved, and Israel will dwell securely. And this is the name by which he will be called: ‘The Lord is our righteousness.’

“Therefore, behold, the days are coming, declares the Lord, when they shall no longer say, ‘As the Lord lives who brought up the people of Israel out of the land of Egypt,’ but ‘As the Lord lives who brought up and led the offspring of the house of Israel out of the north country and out of all the countries where he had driven them.’ Then they shall dwell in their own land.”

He has put the longing for justice within us. This longing is an echo of His voice; His design. We desire justice because God is just, and He is the only One who can make things right.

When Jesus came, He came to invite us into His Kingdom of justice and mercy. He came to bring us secure hope. Though not always as tangible as we’d like, the echoes of justice we can hear now and our lingering desires for justice remind us of the just character of Jesus.

2. Read, pray, and sing through the service:


Don’t use Spotify? Click the song title below to see song on YouTube.

— Advent Candle One —

CALL TO WORSHIP: Isaiah 40:3–5

See passage

A voice cries:
“In the wilderness prepare the way of the Lord;
make straight in the desert a highway for our God.
Every valley shall be lifted up,
and every mountain and hill be made low;
the uneven ground shall become level,
and the rough places a plain.
And the glory of the Lord shall be revealed,
and all flesh shall see it together,
for the mouth of the Lord has spoken.”

Come Thou Long Expected Jesus (Rowland Hugh Prichard, Charles Wesley addl. verse JD Raab)
Even So Come (Jess Cates, Jason Ingram, Chris Tomlin)

CONFESSION OF SIN: from The Worship Sourcebook:

Almighty God, give us grace to cast away the works of darkness and put on the armor of light,
both now in the time of this mortal life into which your Son Jesus Christ came to visit us in great humility,
and that in the last day, when He shall come again in His glorious majesty to judge both the living and the dead,
so that we may rise to the life immortal through Him who lives and reigns with You and the Holy Spirit, one God, now and for ever.
Amen.

Promises (Alvarado, Barnes, Bowe, Gaines, Marin, Moses)

ASSURANCE OF PARDON: Jeremiah 23:5-6

See passage

Behold, the days are coming, declares the Lord, when I will raise up for David a righteous Branch, and He shall reign as king and deal wisely, and shall execute justice and righteousness in the land. In His days Judah will be saved, and Israel will dwell securely. And this is the name by which He will be called: “The Lord is our righteousness.”

PASSING THE PEACE

What is Passing the Peace?
(Click to Read)

When we’ve met as a large group on Sundays, we’ve always had a time of greeting one another after singing. Many churches call this time “passing the peace.” In some church traditions, one person will say to another, “The peace of Christ be with you” to which the other person responds, “And also with you.”

While potentially unfamiliar for some, we felt that “passing the peace” during greeting times at home could be a powerful act in this age marked by very little external peace. In Isaiah 9, Jesus is described as the Prince of Peace. He wants His kingdom to be marked by this very peace! We want to “pass” to one another this peace that only Jesus can give, especially at a time like this.

It might feel a bit cheesy, but we encourage you to actually pray the peace of God over each other during our times. We encourage you to look into each other’s eyes as you say, “The peace of Christ be with you!” and have others respond with, “And also with you.” Be open-hearted to Jesus, asking Him to fill you with His peace.

SERMON & COMMUNION

King Of Kings (Jason Ingram, Brooke Ligertwood, Scott Ligertwood)

BENEDICTION

November 22, 2020

This is the 12th and final week of Matthew Part Two. We’re in Matthew 7:12–4 discussing “Jesus and the Path to Life.”

As a reminder, next Sunday, November 29 is the first Sunday of Advent. Kinda wild. Our series is Echoes of a Voice, focusing on paying attention to our haunted longings as they point us to Jesus for ultimate fulfillment in Him. In this season we’ll be hitting “pause” in a handful of ways: reflections on longings through the tradition of the Advent wreath, guided prayer, and guided fasting. We have a free guide for families and individuals that you can request a copy of here. We’ll mail those out early next week, or you can pick one up at an in-person service starting this Sunday, November 22.

Here’s how you can prepare for this Sunday and our Matthew Part Two finale:

1. Read our text, Matthew 7:12–14.

See passage

“So whatever you wish that others would do to you, do also to them, for this is the Law and the Prophets.

“Enter by the narrow gate. For the gate is wide and the way is easy that leads to destruction, and those who enter by it are many. For the gate is narrow and the way is hard that leads to life, and those who find it are few.”

“Whatever you would want others to do to you, do also to them.” This “Golden Rule” is perhaps the most famous of all Jesus’ teachings, and for good reason. For Jesus, this general rule of life sums up the way that human relationships ought to work in His Kingdom. His Kingdom is to be a realm where people treat one another with the honor, dignity, care, and love that they themselves desire. It’s a beautiful vision for life, and one that we all fall woefully short of. And that’s why Jesus came. In the broader context of Matthew, Jesus is very aware that He has come into a world that is falling short of God’s beautiful vision for life. Jesus was not merely a brilliant rabbi. He came to save us from our destructive plight and to establish a new Kingdom. Unfortunately, many will decide to continue on this path toward destruction. After all, it feels more in line with our bent desires, and there’s plenty of people affirming one another along the way. But Jesus has come to rescue people from that path, and He is inviting all of us to follow Him on the narrow path that leads to the life that is truly life.

2. Read, pray, and sing through the service:


Don’t use Spotify? Click the song title below to see song on YouTube.

CALL TO WORSHIP: Psalm 133

See passage

Behold, how good and pleasant it is
when brothers dwell in unity!
It is like the precious oil on the head,
running down on the beard,
on the beard of Aaron,
running down on the collar of his robes!
It is like the dew of Hermon,
which falls on the mountains of Zion!
For there the Lord has commanded the blessing,
life forevermore.

Grace Alone (Dustin Kensrue)

CONFESSION OF SIN: from Thou, Dear God by Martin Luther King, Jr.:

O Thou Eternal God,
out of whose absolute power and infinite intelligence
the whole universe has come into being.
We humbly confess that we have not loved Thee with our hearts,
souls and minds, and we have not loved our neighbors as Christ loved us.
We have all too often lived by our own selfish impulses
rather than by the life of sacrificial love as revealed by Christ.
We often give in order to receive, we love our friends and hate our enemies,
we go the first mile but dare not travel the second,
we forgive but dare not forget.
And so as we look within ourselves and are confronted with the appalling fact
that the history of our lives is the history of an eternal revolt against Thee.
But Thou, O God, have mercy upon us.
Forgive us for what we could have been but failed to be.
Give us the intelligence to know Thy will. Give us the courage to do Thy will.
Give us the devotion to love Thy will.
In the name and spirit of Jesus we pray. Amen.

ASSURANCE OF PARDON: 2 Corinthians 5:18–21

See passage

All this is from God, who through Christ reconciled us to Himself and gave us the ministry of reconciliation; that is, in Christ God was reconciling the world to Himself, not counting their trespasses against them, and entrusting to us the message of reconciliation. Therefore, we are ambassadors for Christ, God making His appeal through us. We implore you on behalf of Christ, be reconciled to God. For our sake He made Him to be sin who knew no sin, so that in Him we might become the righteousness of God.

O Praise The Name (Anástasis) (Benjamin Hastings, Marty Sampson, Dean Ussher) / Everlasting God (William Murphy, Fellowship Church)

PASSING THE PEACE

What is Passing the Peace?
(Click to Read)

When we’ve met as a large group on Sundays, we’ve always had a time of greeting one another after singing. Many churches call this time “passing the peace.” In some church traditions, one person will say to another, “The peace of Christ be with you” to which the other person responds, “And also with you.”

While potentially unfamiliar for some, we felt that “passing the peace” during greeting times at home could be a powerful act in this age marked by very little external peace. In Isaiah 9, Jesus is described as the Prince of Peace. He wants His kingdom to be marked by this very peace! We want to “pass” to one another this peace that only Jesus can give, especially at a time like this.

It might feel a bit cheesy, but we encourage you to actually pray the peace of God over each other during our times. We encourage you to look into each other’s eyes as you say, “The peace of Christ be with you!” and have others respond with, “And also with you.” Be open-hearted to Jesus, asking Him to fill you with His peace.

SERMON & COMMUNION

Have Mercy On Me (David Gungor, Paul Zach) / Build My Life (Barrett, Kable, Martin, Redman, Younker)

BENEDICTION

November 15, 2020

We’re in week 11 of Matthew, and our topic this week is “Jesus & the Good Father” taken from Matthew 7:7–11.

We’re also just two Sundays away from the start of Advent on Sunday, November 29. Our series this year will be called Echoes of a Voice, focusing on paying attention to our haunted longings as we look to Jesus for their fulfillment. One of the ways we’re making space for this in this season is by hitting “pause” in a handful of ways: reflections on longings through the tradition of the Advent wreath, guided prayer, and guided fasting. We have a free guide for families and individuals that you can request a copy of here. We’ll send those out next Sunday, November 22 (or you can just pick one up at an in-person service).

Here’s how you can prepare for this Sunday:

1. Read our text, Matthew 7:7–11.

See passage

“Ask, and it will be given to you; seek, and you will find; knock, and it will be opened to you. For everyone who asks receives, and the one who seeks finds, and to the one who knocks it will be opened. Or which one of you, if his son asks him for bread, will give him a stone? Or if he asks for a fish, will give him a serpent? If you then, who are evil, know how to give good gifts to your children, how much more will your Father who is in heaven give good things to those who ask Him!”

Jesus’ teaching here is simple and profound, but for various reasons it becomes much more complex in the experience of most of His followers. At the heart of it, He is encouraging His followers to lean into their identity as beloved children of God, and to trust that their heavenly Father loves them deeply and delights to give good gifts to those who ask Him. As simple as this is to describe, it’s complicated by our own experience. For many, it can be hard to relate to God as a good and generous Father because their experience with their own parents was not reflective of that kind of generous love. Jesus acknowledges this reality by saying that if even “evil” parents still generally seek to provide for their children, how much more will our heavenly Father give good things to His children. In our journey toward mature faith we are invited and encouraged to continually approach God with boldness as beloved children. Over time, we learn to value what He values and to trust that He always provides what is good for us, even when it doesn’t make sense from our vantage point. How can we be sure? Because if “He did not spare his own Son but gave him up for us all, how will He not also with Him graciously give us all things?” (Romans 8:32).

2. Read, pray, and sing through the service:


Don’t use Spotify? Click the song title below to see song on YouTube.

CALL TO WORSHIP: Psalm 139:1–2, 7–10

See passage

O LORD, You have searched me and known me!
You know when I sit down and when I rise up;
You discern my thoughts from afar.

Where shall I go from Your Spirit?
Or where shall I flee from Your presence?
If I ascend to heaven, You are there!
If I make my bed in Sheol, You are there!
If I take the wings of the morning
and dwell in the uttermost parts of the sea,
even there Your hand shall lead me,
and Your right hand shall hold me.

Heart Won’t Stop (John Mark McMillan)

CONFESSION OF SIN: Based on Matthew 7:7–11:

Jesus, You said, “Ask and it will be given to you,” and yet we do not ask. Forgive us for not coming to You and believing that You are kind enough to receive us and powerful enough to provide what we need.

You said, “Seek and you will find,” and yet we do not seek. Our restless hearts are slow to turn to You and seek You, our true home. Forgive us for seeking other things first.

You say, “Knock and it will be opened to you” and yet we do not knock. We ignore the open invitation to simply come and enjoy a life of communion with You. Forgive us for pounding on other doors but leaving Your door untouched.

Our Father in heaven, You say You give good gifts to those who ask. While we believe, help our unbelief!

ASSURANCE OF PARDON: 1 John 3:1

See passage

See what kind of love the Father has given to us, that we should be called children of God; and so we are.

How Deep The Father’s Love For Us (Stuart Townend, Charlie Hall arr. Chichi Agorom, The Christian Year)

PASSING THE PEACE

What is Passing the Peace?
(Click to Read)

When we’ve met as a large group on Sundays, we’ve always had a time of greeting one another after singing. Many churches call this time “passing the peace.” In some church traditions, one person will say to another, “The peace of Christ be with you” to which the other person responds, “And also with you.”

While potentially unfamiliar for some, we felt that “passing the peace” during greeting times at home could be a powerful act in this age marked by very little external peace. In Isaiah 9, Jesus is described as the Prince of Peace. He wants His kingdom to be marked by this very peace! We want to “pass” to one another this peace that only Jesus can give, especially at a time like this.

It might feel a bit cheesy, but we encourage you to actually pray the peace of God over each other during our times. We encourage you to look into each other’s eyes as you say, “The peace of Christ be with you!” and have others respond with, “And also with you.” Be open-hearted to Jesus, asking Him to fill you with His peace.

SERMON & COMMUNION

Goodness of God (Cash, Fielding, Ingram, Johnson, Johnson)

BENEDICTION

November 8, 2020

It’s “Jesus and Judging Others” this week, discussing Matthew 7:1–6 from the Sermon on the Mount. We’re continuing in our ongoing Matthew series and this will be week 10 of Part Two.

As a reminder, the season of Advent is fast approaching. In preparation, we have a collection of worship resources for the season at The Christian Year. While it’s definitely too early to break out the Christmas decor (sorry to some of you…) it’s definitely not too early to be leaning into the longing for Jesus that Advent is all about.

On to this Sunday though—here’s how you can prepare!

1. Read our text, Matthew 7:1–6.

See passage

“Judge not, that you be not judged. For with the judgment you pronounce you will be judged, and with the measure you use it will be measured to you. Why do you see the speck that is in your brother’s eye, but do not notice the log that is in your own eye? Or how can you say to your brother, ‘Let me take the speck out of your eye,’ when there is the log in your own eye? You hypocrite, first take the log out of your own eye, and then you will see clearly to take the speck out of your brother’s eye. Do not give dogs what is holy, and do not throw your pearls before pigs, lest they trample them underfoot and turn to attack you.”

“Don’t judge people.” This powerful and direct command of Jesus is as relevant today as it has ever been, but it’s easy to misunderstand. At the heart of this command is a call to turn away from the dehumanizing and degrading culture of moral superiority that has corrupted religious communities. Jesus says that those who insist on judging the actions of others will themselves be judged accordingly. Jesus teaches that the core problem comes from our reluctance to see the depth of our own brokenness and how that brokenness distorts our ability to relate to other people in ways that are actually loving and healing. Jesus calls His people to pay attention first to their own faults and failures. When you have done the hard work to get an honest assessment of yourself and your own need for spectacular mercy, you may be in a better position to lovingly support others on their journey toward the healing and transformative love of God.

2. Read, pray, and sing through the service:


Don’t use Spotify? Click the song title below to see song on YouTube.

CALL TO WORSHIP: Psalm 18:1–2

See passage

I love You, O Lord, my strength.
The Lord is my rock and my fortress and my deliverer,
my God, my rock, in whom I take refuge,
my shield, and the horn of my salvation, my stronghold.

In Christ Alone (Keith Getty, Stuart Townend) / Promises (Alvarado, Barnes, Bowe, Gaines, Marin, Moses)

CONFESSION OF SIN: From The Worship Sourcebook:

Father, You bless those who are merciful,
for they will be shown mercy.
But we have often presided as harsh judges over the lives of others.
We have been quick to place blame
on anything or anyone but ourselves.
We have avoided obligations to care for
or to help people in need.
Lord, have mercy upon us
in the name of the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit. Amen.

ASSURANCE OF PARDON: Ephesians 2:4–7

See passage

But God, being rich in mercy, because of the great love with which He loved us, even when we were dead in our trespasses, made us alive together with Christ—by grace you have been saved—and raised us up with Him and seated us with Him in the heavenly places in Christ Jesus, so that in the coming ages He might show the immeasurable riches of His grace in kindness toward us in Christ Jesus.

Jesus What A Savior (Kirby Kaple)

PASSING THE PEACE

What is Passing the Peace?
(Click to Read)

When we’ve met as a large group on Sundays, we’ve always had a time of greeting one another after singing. Many churches call this time “passing the peace.” In some church traditions, one person will say to another, “The peace of Christ be with you” to which the other person responds, “And also with you.”

While potentially unfamiliar for some, we felt that “passing the peace” during greeting times at home could be a powerful act in this age marked by very little external peace. In Isaiah 9, Jesus is described as the Prince of Peace. He wants His kingdom to be marked by this very peace! We want to “pass” to one another this peace that only Jesus can give, especially at a time like this.

It might feel a bit cheesy, but we encourage you to actually pray the peace of God over each other during our times. We encourage you to look into each other’s eyes as you say, “The peace of Christ be with you!” and have others respond with, “And also with you.” Be open-hearted to Jesus, asking Him to fill you with His peace.

SERMON & COMMUNION

Before The Throne Of God (Charitie Lees Bancroft arr. Shane & Shane)

BENEDICTION

November 1, 2020

Last week we worked through Matthew 6:25–34, discussing Jesus and anxiety. We’re going to camp out here for one more week and focus in on Jesus and emotional health. As always, you can listen to or watch any past Matthew sermon here, including last week if you’d like to hear the overview on this passage before we dig a little deeper.

Another important thing for you to know about this Sunday is that the music and liturgy might feel a little different. We believe that the body of Christ is beautifully diverse, coming from every tribe, tongue, and nation. Part of that diversity can be seen in how we express ourselves in our worship of God. Spend some time with these Gospel songs that you may not know, and think about engaging not only your heart and mind, but also your body! Why? Because Jesus is worthy of everything.

Here’s how you can prepare for this Sunday at Park Church:

1. Read our text, Matthew 6:25–34.

See passage

“Therefore I tell you, fdo not be anxious about your life, what you will eat or what you will drink, nor about your body, what you will put on. Is not life more than food, and the body more than clothing? Look at the birds of the air: they neither sow nor reap nor gather into barns, and yet your heavenly Father feeds them.Are you not of more value than they? And which of you by being anxious can add a single hour to his span of life? And why are you anxious about clothing? Consider the lilies of the field, how they grow: they neither toil nor spin, yet I tell you, even Solomon in all his glory was not arrayed like one of these. But if God so clothes the grass of the field, which today is alive and tomorrow is thrown into the oven, will He not much more clothe you, O you of little faith? Therefore do not be anxious, saying, ‘What shall we eat?’ or ‘What shall we drink?’ or ‘What shall we wear?’ For the Gentiles seek after all these things, and your heavenly Father knows that you need them all. But seek first the kingdom of God and His righteousness, and all these things will be added to you.

“Therefore do not be anxious about tomorrow, for tomorrow will be anxious for itself. Sufficient for the day is its own trouble.”

Last week we considered Jesus’ teaching on anxiety. In the context, Jesus is teaching that faith in God’s Eternal Kingdom and His Fatherly care sets us free from the anxiety that comes from living for material things. The truth is easy to understand, but it can be challenging and complicated to apply.

This week we’ll look at the same passage and the same foundational truth, but we’ll consider some of the broader issues related to faith in the Gospel and our emotional health.

2. Read, pray, and sing through the service:


Don’t use Spotify? Click the song title below to see song on YouTube.

CALL TO WORSHIP: Psalm 16:8–11

See passage

I have set the Lord always before me;
because He is at my right hand, I shall not be shaken.
Therefore my heart is glad, and my whole being rejoices;
my flesh also dwells secure.
For You will not abandon my soul to Sheol,
or let Your holy one see corruption.
You make known to me the path of life;
in Your presence there is fullness of joy;
at Your right hand are pleasures forevermore.

Joy (Anthony Brown, Pat Barrett
 arr. VaShawn Mitchell)

CONFESSION OF SIN: Psalm 51:1–2, 10–12

Have mercy on me, O God,
according to Your steadfast love;
according to Your abundant mercy
blot out my transgressions.
Wash me thoroughly from my iniquity,
and cleanse me from my sin!
Create in me a clean heart, O God,
and renew a right spirit within me.
Cast me not away from Your presence,
and take not Your Holy Spirit from me.
Restore to me the joy of Your salvation,
and uphold me with a willing spirit.

ASSURANCE OF PARDON: 1 John 1:7–9

See passage

But if we walk in the light, as He is in the light, we have fellowship with one another, and the blood of Jesus His Son cleanses us from all sin. If we say we have no sin, we deceive ourselves, and the truth is not in us. If we confess our sins, He is faithful and just to forgive us our sins and to cleanse us from all unrighteousness.

Promises (Alvarado, Barnes, Bowe, Gaines, Marin, Moses)

PASSING THE PEACE

What is Passing the Peace?
(Click to Read)

When we’ve met as a large group on Sundays, we’ve always had a time of greeting one another after singing. Many churches call this time “passing the peace.” In some church traditions, one person will say to another, “The peace of Christ be with you” to which the other person responds, “And also with you.”

While potentially unfamiliar for some, we felt that “passing the peace” during greeting times at home could be a powerful act in this age marked by very little external peace. In Isaiah 9, Jesus is described as the Prince of Peace. He wants His kingdom to be marked by this very peace! We want to “pass” to one another this peace that only Jesus can give, especially at a time like this.

It might feel a bit cheesy, but we encourage you to actually pray the peace of God over each other during our times. We encourage you to look into each other’s eyes as you say, “The peace of Christ be with you!” and have others respond with, “And also with you.” Be open-hearted to Jesus, asking Him to fill you with His peace.

SERMON & COMMUNION

Everlasting God (William Murphy, Fellowship Church) / How Great Is Our God (Ed Cash, Jesse Reeves, Chris Tomlin)

BENEDICTION

October 25, 2020

This week we’ll discuss “Jesus and Anxiety” in our ongoing Matthew series. It’s week seven of Part Two, and week 21 overall (not counting all the times we’ve taken an additional week to expand on something awesome from a previous week!). We’re enjoying spending tons of time in this book—re-listen or re-watch any Matthew sermon here.

Here’s how you can prepare for this Sunday at Park Church:

1. Read our text, Matthew 6:25–34.

See passage

“Therefore I tell you, fdo not be anxious about your life, what you will eat or what you will drink, nor about your body, what you will put on. Is not life more than food, and the body more than clothing? Look at the birds of the air: they neither sow nor reap nor gather into barns, and yet your heavenly Father feeds them.Are you not of more value than they? And which of you by being anxious can add a single hour to his span of life? And why are you anxious about clothing? Consider the lilies of the field, how they grow: they neither toil nor spin, yet I tell you, even Solomon in all his glory was not arrayed like one of these. But if God so clothes the grass of the field, which today is alive and tomorrow is thrown into the oven, will He not much more clothe you, O you of little faith? Therefore do not be anxious, saying, ‘What shall we eat?’ or ‘What shall we drink?’ or ‘What shall we wear?’ For the Gentiles seek after all these things, and your heavenly Father knows that you need them all. But seek first the kingdom of God and His righteousness, and all these things will be added to you.

“Therefore do not be anxious about tomorrow, for tomorrow will be anxious for itself. Sufficient for the day is its own trouble.”

Jesus teaches that those who treasure God and live for His heavenly Kingdom are not only liberated from the bondage of materialism and consumerism (6:19–24), they can also experience freedom from the anxiety that is caused by living for material things. When we are preoccupied with accumulating more and better food or clothing—or any of the things that we often think we need for life—we’ve lost sight of what constitutes true life. True life comes from a relationship with your sovereign Father who loves you and welcomes you into His eternal and incorruptible Kingdom. When you get your heart aligned with the nature of the Kingdom of God, then you are freed from the anxiety of needing to secure and improve your own future. For you have a heavenly Father who is paying attention to your life and who will provide all that you really need to experience the life that is truly life.

2. Read, pray, and sing through the service:


Don’t use Spotify? Click the song title below to see song on YouTube.

CALL TO WORSHIP: From Psalm 91:1–2:

See passage

He who dwells in the shelter of the Most High
will abide in the shadow of the Almighty.
I will say to the Lord, “My refuge and my fortress,
my God, in whom I trust.”

Praise To The Lord The Almighty (Joachim Neander, Catherine Winkworth arr. Citizens, Page CXVI)

CONFESSION OF SIN: From The Worship Sourcebook:

God of love and justice,
we long for peace within and peace without.
We long for harmony in our families,
for serenity in the midst of struggle.
We long for the day when our homes
will be a dwelling place for Your love.
Yet we confess that we are often anxious,
we do not trust each other,
and we harbor violence.
We are not willing to take the risks
and make the sacrifices that love requires.
Look upon us with kindness and grace.
Rule in our homes and in all the world;
show us how to walk in Your paths,
through the mercy of our Savior. Amen.

ASSURANCE OF PARDON: Romans 8:14–17

See passage

For all who are led by the Spirit of God are sons of God. For you did not receive the spirit of slavery to fall back into fear, but you have received the Spirit of adoption as sons, by whom we cry, “Abba! Father!” The Spirit Himself bears witness with our spirit that we are children of God, and if children, then heirs—heirs of God and fellow heirs with Christ, provided we suffer with Him in order that we may also be glorified with Him.

King Of Kings (Jason Ingram, Brooke Ligertwood, Scott Ligertwood) / This Is My Father’s World (Maltbie Davenport Babcock arr. Gungor)

PASSING THE PEACE

What is Passing the Peace?
(Click to Read)

When we’ve met as a large group on Sundays, we’ve always had a time of greeting one another after singing. Many churches call this time “passing the peace.” In some church traditions, one person will say to another, “The peace of Christ be with you” to which the other person responds, “And also with you.”

While potentially unfamiliar for some, we felt that “passing the peace” during greeting times at home could be a powerful act in this age marked by very little external peace. In Isaiah 9, Jesus is described as the Prince of Peace. He wants His kingdom to be marked by this very peace! We want to “pass” to one another this peace that only Jesus can give, especially at a time like this.

It might feel a bit cheesy, but we encourage you to actually pray the peace of God over each other during our times. We encourage you to look into each other’s eyes as you say, “The peace of Christ be with you!” and have others respond with, “And also with you.” Be open-hearted to Jesus, asking Him to fill you with His peace.

SERMON & COMMUNION

Through And Through (Will Reagan) / Stand In Your Love (Baldwin, Harris, Hulse, Springer)

BENEDICTION

October 18, 2020

We continue in Matthew this Sunday, discussing “Jesus and Possessions”.

Also, as a reminder, if you missed Monday’s Love Your Neighbor seminar on the Gospel and Racial Justice (or if you just want to replay it), you can find the video, audio, and other resources from that event here. We ask that you continue to join us in praying for humility, love, and unity as we allow Christ to refine us and as we seek to reflect His love to those around us.

Here’s how you can prepare for this Sunday at Park Church:

1. Read our text, Matthew 6:19–24.

See passage

“Do not lay up for yourselves treasures on earth, where moth and rust destroy and where thieves break in and steal, but lay up for yourselves treasures in heaven, where neither moth nor rust destroys and where thieves do not break in and steal. For where your treasure is, there your heart will be also. The eye is the lamp of the body. So, if your eye is healthy, your whole body will be full of light, but if your eye is bad, your whole body will be full of darkness. If then the light in you is darkness, how great is the darkness! No one can serve two masters, for either he will hate the one and love the other, or he will be devoted to the one and despise the other. You cannot serve God and money.”

In yet another call to a radically distinct way of life, Jesus calls His followers to live free from a slavish preoccupation with wealth and material possessions. When wealth and possessions are valued as a source of security or a status marker, they become like false gods that have the power to deceive and enslave your heart. The power to live free from this bondage to materialism comes first from the realization that material possessions are ultimately doomed for destruction and can never give you what your heart truly craves. More importantly, preoccupation with material accumulation pulls humanity away from a better, and incorruptible treasure. Jesus is calling people into a Kingdom where God is known as the true and eternal source of security and love. God Himself is the treasure our hearts long for, and living for His Kingdom brings indestructible joy.

2. Read, pray, and sing through the service:


Don’t use Spotify? Click the song title below to see song on YouTube.

CALL TO WORSHIP: From Psalm 84:1–2, 10:

See passage

How lovely is Your dwelling place,
O LORD of hosts!
My soul longs, yes, faints
for the courts of the LORD;
my heart and flesh sing for joy
to the living God.

For a day in Your courts is better
than a thousand elsewhere.
I would rather be a doorkeeper in the house of my God
than dwell in the tents of wickedness.

Better (Joseph Pat Barrett, Ed Cash, Chris Tomlin)

CONFESSION OF SIN:

Lord Jesus,

With our mouths we confess that you are our greatest treasure, but with our actions we reveal a desire to lay up treasures on earth and not heaven. Open our eyes to see the ways we’ve done this and forgive us.

Because we can’t serve two masters, Jesus we ask that You would help us see Your true worth and value today. Spirit, stir a devotion for Jesus deep in our bones and help us live accordingly. Release our grip on money and believing that it can make us happy and whole.

Jesus, be the one true treasure that our hearts are devoted to. Only You can satisfy and only You will never fade. Let our hearts and homes reflect this reality.

Amen

Be Thou My Vision (Mary Elizabeth Byrne, Eleanor Henrietta Hull arr. Citizens & Saints)

ASSURANCE OF PARDON: Isaiah 55:1–3

See passage

“Come, everyone who thirsts,
come to the waters;
and he who has no money,
come, buy and eat!
Come, buy wine and milk
without money and without price.
Why do you spend your money for that which is not bread,
and your labor for that which does not satisfy?
Listen diligently to me, and eat what is good,
and delight yourselves in rich food.
Incline your ear, and come to me;
hear, that your soul may live;
and I will make with you an everlasting covenant,
my steadfast, sure love for David.”

PASSING THE PEACE

What is Passing the Peace?
(Click to Read)

When we’ve met as a large group on Sundays, we’ve always had a time of greeting one another after singing. Many churches call this time “passing the peace.” In some church traditions, one person will say to another, “The peace of Christ be with you” to which the other person responds, “And also with you.”

While potentially unfamiliar for some, we felt that “passing the peace” during greeting times at home could be a powerful act in this age marked by very little external peace. In Isaiah 9, Jesus is described as the Prince of Peace. He wants His kingdom to be marked by this very peace! We want to “pass” to one another this peace that only Jesus can give, especially at a time like this.

It might feel a bit cheesy, but we encourage you to actually pray the peace of God over each other during our times. We encourage you to look into each other’s eyes as you say, “The peace of Christ be with you!” and have others respond with, “And also with you.” Be open-hearted to Jesus, asking Him to fill you with His peace.

SERMON & COMMUNION

I Belong To You (Hagan Anderson, William McDowell) / Take My Life And Let It Be (Frances Ridley Havergal, Henri Abraham Cesar Malan arr. Norton Hall Band)

BENEDICTION

October 11, 2020

This week we’ll discuss Fasting in our ongoing Matthew series. This completes the section of the Sermon on the Mount where Jesus is focusing on internal motives for spiritual practices.

Here’s how you can prepare for this Sunday!

1. Read our text, Matthew 6:16–18.

See passage

“And when you fast, do not look gloomy like the hypocrites, for they disfigure their faces that their fasting may be seen by others. Truly, I say to you, they have received their reward. But when you fast, anoint your head and wash your face, that your fasting may not be seen by others but by your Father who is in secret. And your Father who sees in secret will reward you.””

This is the third teaching on the importance of tending to the internal motivations that drive your spiritual practices. Here Jesus is focused on the practice of fasting. Fasting, which is to purposefully refrain from food (or some other basic need) for a set period of time, has been a common practice for the people of God throughout the ages. In first century Judaism, the whole community would fast together in weekly rhythms, during certain annual holidays, and for other situational reasons. Though the specific purposes for fasting may vary (deliverance, direction, provision, renewal, etc.), Biblical fasting is a physical expression of a spiritual hunger for God.

Like all religious activity, this good spiritual practice can easily get commandeered and distorted for self-exalting purposes. Jesus again calls His disciples to turn away from the desire to practice these religious activities in order to gain the approval of others. Instead, He encourages His followers to fast in the context of their relationship with their Heavenly Father who sees the heart. Fasting is not to earn God’s love. Rather, it is an expression of a hunger to know and experience more of the Father’s power and love towards His children.

2. Read, pray, and sing through the service:


Don’t use Spotify? Click the song title below to see song on YouTube.

CALL TO WORSHIP: From Psalm 36:7–9:

See passage

How precious is Your steadfast love, O God!
The children of mankind take refuge in the shadow of Your wings.
They feast on the abundance of Your house,
and You give them drink from the river of Your delights.
For with You is the fountain of life;
in Your light do we see light.

Promises (Alvarado, Barnes, Bowe, Gaines, Marin, Moses)

CONFESSION OF SIN: From The Worship Sourcebook:

God of everlasting love,
we confess that we have been unfaithful
to our covenant with You and with one another.
We have worshiped other gods: money, power, greed, and convenience.
We have served our own self-interest
instead of serving only You and Your people.
We have not loved our neighbor as You have commanded,

nor have we rightly loved ourselves.
Forgive us, gracious God,
and bring us back into the fullness
of our covenant with You and one another.
Through Christ, our Lord. Amen.

Yet Even Now (Joel Limpic)

ASSURANCE OF PARDON: Psalm 103:8, 11–13

See passage

The LORD is merciful and gracious,
slow to anger and abounding in steadfast love.
For as high as the heavens are above the earth,
so great is His steadfast love toward those who fear Him;
as far as the east is from the west,
so far does He remove our transgressions from us.
As a father shows compassion to his children,
so the LORD shows compassion to those who fear Him.

PASSING THE PEACE

What is Passing the Peace?
(Click to Read)

When we’ve met as a large group on Sundays, we’ve always had a time of greeting one another after singing. Many churches call this time “passing the peace.” In some church traditions, one person will say to another, “The peace of Christ be with you” to which the other person responds, “And also with you.”

While potentially unfamiliar for some, we felt that “passing the peace” during greeting times at home could be a powerful act in this age marked by very little external peace. In Isaiah 9, Jesus is described as the Prince of Peace. He wants His kingdom to be marked by this very peace! We want to “pass” to one another this peace that only Jesus can give, especially at a time like this.

It might feel a bit cheesy, but we encourage you to actually pray the peace of God over each other during our times. We encourage you to look into each other’s eyes as you say, “The peace of Christ be with you!” and have others respond with, “And also with you.” Be open-hearted to Jesus, asking Him to fill you with His peace.

SERMON & COMMUNION

We Are Hungry (Brad Kilman) / Set A Fire (Will Reagan)

BENEDICTION

October 4, 2020

This week in our ongoing Matthew series, we talk through “Jesus and Prayer” in Matthew 6:5–15. We’re getting into the Lord’s Prayer here toward the end of the Sermon on the Mount.

Want to get fired up on this passage? Here are four messages on the Lord’s Prayer from our Teach Us To Pray series in January of last year.

As for this Sunday, here’s how you can prepare:

1. Read our text, Matthew 6:5–15.

See passage

“And when you pray, you must not be like the hypocrites. For they love to stand and pray in the synagogues and at the street corners, that they may be seen by others. Truly, I say to you, they have received their reward. But when you pray, go into your room and shut the door and pray to your Father who is in secret. And your Father who sees in secret will reward you.

And when you pray, do not heap up empty phrases as the Gentiles do, for they think that they will be heard for their many words. Do not be like them, for your Father knows what you need before you ask Him. Pray then like this:

‘Our Father in heaven,
hallowed be Your name.
Your kingdom come,
Your will be done,
on earth as it is in heaven.
Give us this day our daily bread,
and forgive us our debts,
as we also have forgiven our debtors.
And lead us not into temptation,
but deliver us from evil.’

For if you forgive others their trespasses, your heavenly Father will also forgive you, but if you do not forgive others their trespasses, neither will your Father forgive your trespasses.”

This is Jesus’ second of three teachings on the internal motives of spiritual practices. In this teaching He focuses on the practice of prayer. The teaching assumes that prayer is a part of the daily life of disciples, and that was definitely the case for most people in the Jewish community. Not only would they pray corporately in their synagogues, but they would also stop as a community to pray three times a day from wherever they were. Some used these contexts to showcase their spirituality. Others were using prayer as a way to try to manipulate God to do what they wanted. Both of these distortions miss the point of prayer altogether. Jesus teaches that prayer is, at its very heart, relational communion between a beloved child of God and their Good Heavenly Father.

In the Lord’s Prayer, Jesus is teaching His followers a better way to commune with God. It’s not intended to be a mechanical formula, but more of a framework and a guide to help people talk with God in ways that are natural, honest, and healthy. This life-transforming invitation to commune and converse with your heavenly Father lies at the heart of what Jesus came to provide for His followers. He came to reconcile us to God.

2. Read, pray, and sing through the service:


Don’t use Spotify? Click the song title below to see song on YouTube.

CALL TO WORSHIP: From Revelation 15:3–4:

See passage

Great and amazing are Your deeds,
O Lord God the Almighty!
Just and true are Your ways,
O King of the nations!
Who will not fear, O Lord,
and glorify Your name?
For You alone are holy.
All nations will come
and worship You,
for Your righteous acts have been revealed.

Holy, Holy, Holy (Reginald Heber, John Bacchus Dykes) / Yes And Amen (Anthony Brown, Chris McClarney, Nate Moore)

CONFESSION OF SIN: Matthew 6:9–13:

See passage

Our Father in heaven,
hallowed be Your name.
Your kingdom come,
Your will be done,
on earth as it is in heaven.
Give us this day our daily bread,
and forgive us our debts,
as we also have forgiven our debtors.
And lead us not into temptation,
but deliver us from evil.

ASSURANCE OF PARDON: Psalm 103:8, 11–13

See passage

The LORD is merciful and gracious,
slow to anger and abounding in steadfast love.
For as high as the heavens are above the earth,
so great is His steadfast love toward those who fear Him;
as far as the east is from the west,
so far does He remove our transgressions from us.
As a father shows compassion to his children,
so the LORD shows compassion to those who fear Him.

Your Love Is Strong (Jon Foreman arr. Robbie Seay)

PASSING THE PEACE

What is Passing the Peace?
(Click to Read)

When we’ve met as a large group on Sundays, we’ve always had a time of greeting one another after singing. Many churches call this time “passing the peace.” In some church traditions, one person will say to another, “The peace of Christ be with you” to which the other person responds, “And also with you.”

While potentially unfamiliar for some, we felt that “passing the peace” during greeting times at home could be a powerful act in this age marked by very little external peace. In Isaiah 9, Jesus is described as the Prince of Peace. He wants His kingdom to be marked by this very peace! We want to “pass” to one another this peace that only Jesus can give, especially at a time like this.

It might feel a bit cheesy, but we encourage you to actually pray the peace of God over each other during our times. We encourage you to look into each other’s eyes as you say, “The peace of Christ be with you!” and have others respond with, “And also with you.” Be open-hearted to Jesus, asking Him to fill you with His peace.

SERMON & COMMUNION

Good Good Father (Anthony Brown, Pat Barrett)
Oh Come Let Us Adore Him (Vined Y Adoremos) (Stewart Landon)

BENEDICTION

September 27, 2020

We continue this Sunday in our Matthew series, discussing “Jesus and Generosity.”

Why are we in Matthew? The Gospel According to Matthew is one of the earliest biographies of Jesus, presenting Jesus not as a mere historical figure, but as “good news” for the world that should reshape every part of life.

Additionally, this Sunday, September 27, we’re joining with thousands of churches across America in what’s being called “Repentance Sunday.” During each of our services we’ll take time to pause, repent, and pray for revival across our cities and world. More on that below!

Here’s how you can prepare for this Sunday:

1. Read our text, Matthew 6:1–4.

See passage

“Beware of practicing your righteousness before other people in order to be seen by them, for then you will have no reward from your Father who is in heaven. Thus, when you give to the needy, sound no trumpet before you, as the hypocrites do in the synagogues and in the streets, that they may be praised by others. Truly, I say to you, they have received their reward. But when you give to the needy, do not let your left hand know what your right hand is doing, so that your giving may be in secret. And your Father who sees in secret will reward you.”

This teaching marks the beginning of a new section in the Sermon on the Mount. The focus of this section is the call to pay attention to your inner motives for good works. Jesus is teaching that His Kingdom people ought to be driven by a healthy desire to please their Heavenly Father rather than by cravings for public notoriety and human approval. To work out this teaching in real life, Jesus gives three examples of core spiritual practices that marked Jewish religious life: giving to the needy, prayer, and fasting.

Jesus assumes that giving to the needy is a part of the life of His listeners. He doesn’t expand on the practice here, but instead focuses on the heart motivation. He says that those who perform good works like giving to the needy in order to be seen by people are like performers who may receive applause from people, but they won’t receive anything from God. On the other hand, those who freely give out of love for people will be rewarded by their Heavenly Father.

2. Read, pray, and sing through the service:


Don’t use Spotify? Click the song title below to see song on YouTube.

CALL TO WORSHIP: Psalm 121:1–3:

See passage

I lift up my eyes to the hills.
From where does my help come?
My help comes from the Lord,
who made heaven and earth.
He will not let your foot be moved;
He who keeps you will not slumber.

Fall Afresh (Jeremy Riddle)

PRAYER OF CONFESSION: Adapted from The Worship Sourcebook:

The phrases below in regular text will be read by the leader. The bolded text will be read all-together.

Lord, You said, “If you love me, you will obey what I command.”
Forgive us our lukewarm love and our disobedience.

Lord, You said, “You may ask for anything in my name.”
Forgive us when we think we need to solve our own problems.

Lord, You said, “Do not let your hearts be troubled and do not be afraid.”
We confess that our lives are often consumed by worry and anxiety.

Lord, You said, “If you remain in me and I in you, you will bear much fruit.”
Forgive us our barren lives, Lord.

Lord, You said, “You must testify, for you have been with me.”
We confess, Lord, that we have been too often silent.

Lord, You said, “Love each other as I have loved you.”
We confess that we are quick to anger, contempt, and division.

Lord, You said, “Seek first the Kingdom of God and His righteousness.”
We confess that we often seek first our own little kingdoms of material comforts, human approval, and personal glory.

In these and in so many other ways, we confess our failures and shortcomings. Amen.

PRAYER FOR REVIVAL: Reflection on Ephesians 3:14–21 (NIV):

The phrases below in regular text will be read by the leader. The bolded text will be read all-together.

For this reason I kneel before the Father, from Whom every family in heaven and on earth derives its name.

Father, today we kneel with our brothers and sisters around the nation, and we confess that we need You. We need Your Spirit to revive our hearts, our churches, and our cities.

I pray that out of His glorious riches He may strengthen you with power through His Spirit in your inner being, so that Christ may dwell in your hearts through faith. And I pray that you, being rooted and established in love, may have power, together with all the Lord’s holy people, to grasp how wide and long and high and deep is the love of Christ, and to know this love that surpasses knowledge—that you may be filled to the measure of all the fullness of God.

Father we pray that You would pour out Your Spirit of power on us so that we would truly and experientially know the immeasurable love that You have for us in Christ. And we pray that You would fill us up with Your fullness, that we would be a fresh and radiant reflection of Your glory to the world around us.

Now to Him who is able to do immeasurably more than all we ask or imagine, according to His power that is at work within us, to Him be glory in the church and in Christ Jesus throughout all generations, for ever and ever! Amen.

Father, just like You brought revival to communities and cities and nations of old, we pray that You would do it again. We can’t do anything apart from You. Let us be a generation that seeks Your face! Give us a blazing passion for Christ and His Kingdom—and do in us and through us more than we could ever ask or imagine. For the sake of Your Kingdom and Your glory. Amen.

Give Us Clean Hands (Charlie Hall)
Rock Of Ages (Augustus Montague Toplady arr. Page CXVI)

PASSING THE PEACE

What is Passing the Peace?
(Click to Read)

When we’ve met as a large group on Sundays, we’ve always had a time of greeting one another after singing. Many churches call this time “passing the peace.” In some church traditions, one person will say to another, “The peace of Christ be with you” to which the other person responds, “And also with you.”

While potentially unfamiliar for some, we felt that “passing the peace” during greeting times at home could be a powerful act in this age marked by very little external peace. In Isaiah 9, Jesus is described as the Prince of Peace. He wants His kingdom to be marked by this very peace! We want to “pass” to one another this peace that only Jesus can give, especially at a time like this.

It might feel a bit cheesy, but we encourage you to actually pray the peace of God over each other during our times. We encourage you to look into each other’s eyes as you say, “The peace of Christ be with you!” and have others respond with, “And also with you.” Be open-hearted to Jesus, asking Him to fill you with His peace.

SERMON & COMMUNION

Take My Life And Let It Be (Frances Ridley Havergal, Henri Abraham Cesar Malan)

BENEDICTION