September 6, 2020

We’re back in the book of Matthew, taking us through until Advent! This Sunday marks the beginning of Part Two of this multi-part, multi-year series. It’s a lot of Matthew, folks. We’ll be picking up where we left off

So why did we choose Matthew? The Gospel According to Matthew is one of the earliest biographies of Jesus, presenting Jesus not as a mere historical figure, but as “good news” for the world that should reshape every part of life. To listen to any sermon from Part One of the series, visit the Matthew series archive. To listen to the first sermon from Part Two, join us online or in-person on Sunday.

However you join us, here’s how you can prepare this week:

1. Read our text, Matthew 5:38–42.

See passage

“You have heard that it was said, ‘An eye for an eye and a tooth for a tooth.’ But I say to you, Do not resist the one who is evil. But if anyone slaps you on the right cheek, turn to him the other also. And if anyone would sue you and take your tunic, let him have your cloak as well. And if anyone forces you to go one mile, go with him two miles. Give to the one who begs from you, and do not refuse the one who would borrow from you.”

The concept of retributive justice—embodied in the term “an eye for an eye”—has been a hallmark of many societies throughout world history. This concept was core to the instructions for civil justice given to ancient Israel in the Mosaic Law. It seems equitable that someone who has caused pain to another human should be punished with a penalty that is proportionate to their offense. Although this approach to justice may have its place in broken human societies, Jesus is calling His Kingdom people to be marked by something far more transformative than retaliation: sacrificial love.

“Turn the other cheek” is one of the most radical and controversial teachings of Jesus. It may seem like He is calling His people to be passive doormats who allow themselves to get trampled on by others, but that’s not what He is doing. He is calling for His people to actively respond to wrongs that they have suffered by choosing to absorb the offense in order to show sacrificial love to the offender, while trusting in God’s commitment to execute justice. This kind of love, radical though it may be, has the power to bring transformation to relationships and communities. And this is exactly the kind of love that Jesus embodied in His mission to transform our hearts and redeem the world.

2. Read, pray, and sing through the service:

Download Lyrics (PDF)


Don’t use Spotify? Click the song title below to see song on YouTube.

CALL TO WORSHIP: Ephesians 2:1–2, 5:

See passage

And you were dead in the trespasses and sins in which you once walked, following the course of this world… But God, being rich in mercy, because of the great love with which He loved us, even when we were dead in our trespasses, made us alive together with Christ—by grace you have been saved…

Made Alive (Brian Eichelberger, Zach Bolen) / This Is Amazing Grace (Josh Farro, Jeremy Riddle, Phil Wickham)
Shout To The Lord (Darlene Zschech)

CONFESSION OF SIN: From Thou, Dear God by Martin Luther King, Jr.:

Oh God, our gracious heavenly Father,
we thank Thee for the inspiration of Jesus the Christ.
And grant that we will love Thee with all of our hearts, souls, and minds,
and love our neighbors as we love ourselves,
even our enemy neighbors.
And we ask Thee, oh God, in these days of emotional tension,
when the problems of the world are gigantic in extent and chaotic in detail,
to be with us in our going out and our coming in,
in our rising up and in our lying down,
in our moments of joy and in our moments of sorrow,
until the day when there shall be no sunset and no dawning. Amen.

ASSURANCE OF PARDON: Romans 5:6–8

See passage

For while we were still weak, at the right time Christ died for the ungodly. For one will scarcely die for a righteous person—though perhaps for a good person one would dare even to die—but God shows His love for us in that while we were still sinners, Christ died for us.

PASSING THE PEACE

What is Passing the Peace?
(Click to Read)

When we’ve met as a large group on Sundays, we’ve always had a time of greeting one another after singing. Many churches call this time “passing the peace.” In some church traditions, one person will say to another, “The peace of Christ be with you” to which the other person responds, “And also with you.”

While potentially unfamiliar for some, we felt that “passing the peace” during greeting times at home could be a powerful act in this age marked by very little external peace. In Isaiah 9, Jesus is described as the Prince of Peace. He wants His kingdom to be marked by this very peace! We want to “pass” to one another this peace that only Jesus can give, especially at a time like this.

It might feel a bit cheesy, but we encourage you to actually pray the peace of God over each other during our times. We encourage you to look into each other’s eyes as you say, “The peace of Christ be with you!” and have others respond with, “And also with you.” Be open-hearted to Jesus, asking Him to fill you with His peace.

SERMON & COMMUNION

Victory Belongs to Jesus (Todd Dulaney) / I Surrender All (Judson W. Van DeVenter, Winfield S. Weeden)

BENEDICTION

August 30, 2020

In early fall every year, we take time to revisit and recenter around the mission of our church: we exist to make disciples of Jesus for the glory of God and the joy of all people. This is the last week of this year’s “Mission” series, Following Jesus in the Wilderness. In step with our ongoing Matthew series, this mini-series has addressed the tension and “waiting” of the wilderness.

Here’s how you can prepare for this Sunday, Following Jesus Toward A Life of Love:

1. Read our text, Matthew 28:16–20.

Read, pray, and sing through the service:

Download Lyrics (PDF)


Don’t use Spotify? Click the song title below to see song on YouTube.

CALL TO WORSHIP: Psalm 63:1–4:

See passage

O God, You are my God; earnestly I seek You;
my soul thirsts for You;
my flesh faints for You,
as in a dry and weary land where there is no water.
So I have looked upon You in the sanctuary,
beholding Your power and glory.
Because Your steadfast love is better than life,
my lips will praise You.
So I will bless You as long as I live;
in Your name I will lift up my hands.

Joy (Anthony Brown, Pat Barrett
 arr. VaShawn Mitchell) / Joyful, Joyful We Adore Thee (Ludwig van Beethoven, Edward Hodges,
 Henry Van Dyke)

CONFESSION OF SIN: From The Worship Sourcebook:

Everlasting God,
fountain of all life and the true home of every heart:
our hearts are restless until they rest in You.
Yet we confess that our hearts have been enslaved
by selfish passion and base desire.
We have sought after many things
and have neglected the one thing needful.
We have not loved You with our whole hearts;
help us to turn to You and find forgiveness.
Lead us home, that we may again find in You
our life and joy and peace. Amen.

Heart Of God (Aodhan King, Jonas Myrin)

ASSURANCE OF PARDON: 1 Peter 2:24–25

See passage

He Himself bore our sins in His body on the tree, that we might die to sin and live to righteousness. By His wounds you have been healed. For you were straying like sheep, but have now returned to the Shepherd and Overseer of your souls.

PASSING THE PEACE

What is Passing the Peace?
(Click to Read)

When we’ve met as a large group on Sundays, we’ve always had a time of greeting one another after singing. Many churches call this time “passing the peace.” In some church traditions, one person will say to another, “The peace of Christ be with you” to which the other person responds, “And also with you.”

While potentially unfamiliar for some, we felt that “passing the peace” during greeting times at home could be a powerful act in this age marked by very little external peace. In Isaiah 9, Jesus is described as the Prince of Peace. He wants His kingdom to be marked by this very peace! We want to “pass” to one another this peace that only Jesus can give, especially at a time like this.

It might feel a bit cheesy, but we encourage you to actually pray the peace of God over each other during our times. We encourage you to look into each other’s eyes as you say, “The peace of Christ be with you!” and have others respond with, “And also with you.” Be open-hearted to Jesus, asking Him to fill you with His peace.

SERMON & COMMUNION

Jesus What A Savior (Kirby Kaple)

BENEDICTION

August 23, 2020

We’re in week two of three for this year’s “Mission” series, Following Jesus in the Wilderness. Every Fall we take time to revisit and recenter around the mission of our church: we exist to make disciples of Jesus for the glory of God and the joy of all people. In step with our ongoing Matthew series, this mini-series addresses the tension and “waiting” of the wilderness.

Here’s how you can prepare for this Sunday:

Read, pray, and sing through the service:

Download Lyrics (PDF)


Don’t use Spotify? Click the song title below to see song on YouTube.

CALL TO WORSHIP: Psalm 63:1–4:

See passage

O God, You are my God; earnestly I seek You;
my soul thirsts for You;
my flesh faints for You,
as in a dry and weary land where there is no water.
So I have looked upon You in the sanctuary,
beholding Your power and glory.
Because Your steadfast love is better than life,
my lips will praise You.
So I will bless You as long as I live;
in Your name I will lift up my hands.

Doxology (Louis Bourgeois, Thomas Ken) / Better (Joseph Pat Barrett, Ed Cash, Chris Tomlin)
Lord I Need You (Carson, Maher, Nockels, Reeves, Stanfill) / The Medicine (Dee Wilson)

CONFESSION OF SIN: From The Worship Sourcebook:

Lord, we are like sheep, and we get lost.
We forget the needs of our neighbors and do not love You above all else.
We need a Savior, so we long for Jesus.
Come, fill our lives, Jesus. Amen.

ASSURANCE OF PARDON: 1 John 4:14–16

See passage

And we have seen and testify that the Father has sent His Son to be the Savior of the world. Whoever confesses that Jesus is the Son of God, God abides in him, and he in God. So we have come to know and to believe the love that God has for us. God is love, and whoever abides in love abides in God, and God abides in him.

PASSING THE PEACE

What is Passing the Peace?
(Click to Read)

When we’ve met as a large group on Sundays, we’ve always had a time of greeting one another after singing. Many churches call this time “passing the peace.” In some church traditions, one person will say to another, “The peace of Christ be with you” to which the other person responds, “And also with you.”

While potentially unfamiliar for some, we felt that “passing the peace” during greeting times at home could be a powerful act in this age marked by very little external peace. In Isaiah 9, Jesus is described as the Prince of Peace. He wants His kingdom to be marked by this very peace! We want to “pass” to one another this peace that only Jesus can give, especially at a time like this.

It might feel a bit cheesy, but we encourage you to actually pray the peace of God over each other during our times. We encourage you to look into each other’s eyes as you say, “The peace of Christ be with you!” and have others respond with, “And also with you.” Be open-hearted to Jesus, asking Him to fill you with His peace.

SERMON & COMMUNION

New Wine (Brooke Ligertwood) / Sometimes By Step (Step by Step) (David (Beaker) Strasser, Rich Mullins)

BENEDICTION

August 16, 2020

Every Fall we take time to revisit and recenter around the mission of our church: we exist to make disciples of Jesus for the glory of God and the joy of all people. In step with our ongoing Matthew series, these next three weeks will address the tension and “waiting” of the wilderness.

Here’s how you can prepare for this Sunday and week one of Following Jesus in the Wilderness:

1. Read through our text for the week:

This week, it’s more like “texts”—this particular message doesn’t have a singular, key passage. Instead, we’ll draw on 1 Corinthians 10:1–13 and Matthew 4:18–22.

We find ourselves in a unique cultural moment that has shaken the fabric of our society. What does it look like to follow Jesus—to be a disciple—in this particular season? Throughout  history, the people of God have used the metaphor of the “Wilderness” to describe the journey through the challenges and trials of life. The wilderness is a hard place to be. It is confusing. It is disorienting. It is exhausting. It is dangerous. And it is a place where God does deep, necessary, and transformative work in the lives of His people. This week we will look at this theme in Matthew and Exodus as we consider what it means to follow Jesus through the wilderness.

2. Read, pray, and sing through the service:

Download Lyrics (PDF)


Don’t use Spotify? Click the song title below to see song on YouTube.

CALL TO WORSHIP: Psalm 63:1–4:

See passage

O God, You are my God; earnestly I seek You;
my soul thirsts for You;
my flesh faints for You,
as in a dry and weary land where there is no water.
So I have looked upon You in the sanctuary,
beholding Your power and glory.
Because Your steadfast love is better than life,
my lips will praise You.
So I will bless You as long as I live;
in Your name I will lift up my hands.

You Keep On Getting Better (Dante Bowe, Jonathan Jay, Majesty Rose)
Build My Life (Barrett, Kable, Martin, Redman, Younker)

CONFESSION OF SIN: From The Worship Sourcebook:

Almighty God, we confess how hard it is to be Your people.
You have called us to be the church,
to continue the mission of Jesus Christ to our lonely and confused world.
Yet we acknowledge we are more apathetic than active,
isolated than involved, callous than compassionate,
obstinate than obedient, legalistic than loving.
Gracious Lord, have mercy upon us and forgive our sins.
Remove the obstacles preventing us
from being Your representatives to a broken world.
Awaken our hearts to the promised gift of Your indwelling Spirit.
This we pray in Jesus’ powerful name. Amen.

ASSURANCE OF PARDON: Romans 5:1

See passage

Therefore, since we have been justified by faith, we have peace with God through our Lord Jesus Christ.

PASSING THE PEACE

What is Passing the Peace?
(Click to Read)

When we’ve met as a large group on Sundays, we’ve always had a time of greeting one another after singing. Many churches call this time “passing the peace.” In some church traditions, one person will say to another, “The peace of Christ be with you” to which the other person responds, “And also with you.”

While potentially unfamiliar for some, we felt that “passing the peace” during greeting times at home could be a powerful act in this age marked by very little external peace. In Isaiah 9, Jesus is described as the Prince of Peace. He wants His kingdom to be marked by this very peace! We want to “pass” to one another this peace that only Jesus can give, especially at a time like this.

It might feel a bit cheesy, but we encourage you to actually pray the peace of God over each other during our times. We encourage you to look into each other’s eyes as you say, “The peace of Christ be with you!” and have others respond with, “And also with you.” Be open-hearted to Jesus, asking Him to fill you with His peace.

SERMON & COMMUNION

The Lord Is My Banner (Joel Limpic) / Surrounded (Fight My Battles) (Elyssa Smith)
Blessed Be Your Name (Beth Redman, Matt Redman)

BENEDICTION